Mental v Physical

Personal Ads & Forum General Discussion Mental v Physical

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  • #138877
    🧚🏼‍♀️
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male & Female
    • USA
    • Florida

    For all of the men here who have stated that inducing lactation can be as psychological as it is physical, are there any women who have had success that can back that up?

    Thanks, loves. 🧚🏼‍♀️

    #138891
    Elizabeth
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male
    • USA
    • Nebraska

    Just to be sure, there are claims that inducing is something a person can fail or be successful at base on psychological desire, willpower. If you can believe it, you can achieve it? A self fulfilling prophecy?

    I’ve heard of some really whackadoodle shit when it comes to inducing lactation, I think this takes the cake. If a person can will themselves to lactate what would stop someone from willing cancer away, willing away infertility, erectile dysfunction, or anything else?

    #138907
    Morgan
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male & Female
    • USA
    • Florida

    I don’t think OP was referring to willing themselves into production (please correct me if I’m wrong). I took the post as attitude. And yes, your attitude can have a HUGE impact on both psychological physiological wellness (including lactation). Stress releases cortisol, which, as a hormone, affects EVERY system in our bodies.

    So yes, mindset is crucial in this process.
    Xo

    #138978
    Effervescent1
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male
    • USA
    • California

    Inducing lactation can also stir up
    A lot of hormones. I recall feeling like my emotions were much closer to the surface while inducing. I attributed the changes to the fluctuation in hormones. It also became clear to me that I would prefer to induce with the support of a partner rather than on my own or being long distance, because of the heightened emotions. Of course, each persons body may react differently.

    #139032
    Dr Sensitive
    Participant
    • Male
    • Looking for: Female
    • USA
    • California

    I am not a Dr. Well, I am, but not “that” kind. Nor of course am I a woman.

    Anyway, the purported mechanism of inducing goes something like this: Stimulation of the nipples (primarily, given how laden with nerves they are) triggers a release of hormones, which in turn can stimulate changes in the breast tissues that promotes the production of milk.

    It’s true that psychology can play a role in physiology, and the closeness beyond mere nipple stimulation will undoubtedly help. But I’d think it’s still a relatively minor role compared to the cycle of physical and hormonal stimulation.

    A related point that bothers me is how induction is frequently over-promoted in terms of how much success a woman can expect or hope for. Some women are naturals, and can induce, or re-induce, with ease. But I’ve also known many women who have tried with utter determination for many, many months with virtually no results.

    In my opinion, it would be a shameful mistake to suggest that a woman’s lack of bountiful results is due to insufficient “willpower” or other psychological positivity, or indeed insufficient physical efforts either. For many, if not most women, it’s more difficult than commonly promoted.

    #139302
    Elizabeth
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male
    • USA
    • Nebraska

    Dr Sensitive, you’re correct. Stimulation triggers the body to produce prolactin, prolactin triggers mammary development and milk production, oxytocin also plays a role in production of breast milk. Demand along with hormones maintains supply.

    I know of a few women that were never able to induce lactation, even with the use of domperidone. From what I have seen most women give up on inducing or they give up on maintaining a supply. Despite what people say, it’s a lot of work and it is expensive, I don’t think most women know just how difficult it is. It was definitely more work than I was expecting, and I did a lot of research before I tried inducing.

    There are no studies that I have ever found that show a correlation between cortisol and low milk supply. If anyone knows of any please post them or send them in a message. If cortisol was really [sic] that detrimental to inducing I think there would be very very few women able to pull it off.

    #139406
    Morgan
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male & Female
    • USA
    • Florida

    @lusciousliz a 2 second Google search produced more results than I could list here. I’ll link this one, but you can continue the search on your own. If I thought you were TRULY interested, I’d take the time and link more, but I do not believe that is the case.

    https://utswmed.org/medblog/decrease-breast-milk-supply/

    #139410
    Morgan
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male & Female
    • USA
    • Florida

    Cortisol affects EVERY organ in your body, including yoir reproductive organs. It can impair production, as well as affect the ratios of fats, carbohydrates, and other constituents of breadt milk.

    #139517
    Elizabeth
    Participant
    • Female
    • Looking for: Male
    • USA
    • Nebraska

    I searched good for studies 2 days ago and I read what that doctor is claiming; I also noticed she did not cite any studies. Yes stress can trigger the production of cortisol, but correlation does not imply causation.

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